Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Just for Dads’ Category

I am usually known as an encourager, although from time to time I have been known to really wallow in pessimism and have one absolutely *terrific* pity-party with anyone and everyone invited.    But with the overwhelming, frequent soundbites each day of the “free-falling economy,” the “downward spiral on Wall Street” with “no end in sight, ” it’s sometimes difficult to keep a positive outlook.

I’ve thought a lot recently about something Franklin Delano Roosevelt said in his first inaugural address in 1933:   “The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.”    Fear is palpable in our country right now, especially in the media who feeds it to us daily on a frequent basis.

Yesterday, thankfully, I read something so encouraging about one CEO’s decision to not give in to the mindset espoused by the media that I wanted to share it here in hopes that this choice might spread rapidly across our nation like a virus.   It already did there at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.

All it takes is one person making a conscious decision to look for an alternative to layoffs,  being willing to give up something in order to help out others in jeopardy of their livelihood,  asking other workers to come alongside and share with the load of keeping everyone employed.

paul-levy-beth-israel

Read about President and CEO Paul Levy’s alternative to layoffs here and how his staff responded to his request for sacrifice.

Their response, in my opinion, is akin to the actions shown by my grandparents’ generation in the Great  Depression when extended families and neighbors reached out to help each other when there was a need.

It reminds me of my parents’ generation – the so-called Greatest Generation – when they came together as “one nation” in World War II to fight to preserve the sanctity and safety of their families here at home.

It’s about time that my generation – the Boomers – gets off their collective blessed assurance and show that we are capable of  carrying that same torch to keep our nation whole and healthy as our parents and grandparents before us.   Our children and grandchildren deserve no less.

Read Full Post »

I just found my new theme song.  Now to drive my kids crazy with it until they refill my coffee cup!  Enjoy!  🙂

Read Full Post »

TED talks often provide some very profound messages.  This was one of them.

Barry Schwartz makes a passionate call for practical wisdom as an antidote to a society gone mad with bureaucracy. He argues powerfully that rules often fail us, incentives often backfire, and practical, everyday wisdom will help rebuild our world.

Enjoy! 😀

Read Full Post »

Today has been an unusual day, to say the least.  While I haven’t been posting as frequently as in the past, there were several good reasons for that.  One was the fact that my brother has been undergoing surgery and medical tests to determine the extent of cancer that was recently diagnosed.  Today, after waiting for what seemed like *forever*, we learned that the cancer is contained in one small area of the body and will be treated with chemotherapy as he is not a candidate for surgery.  Major, MAJOR  “happy dance”!

happy-dance

Tonight, in my Monday evening Village class, I had the pure, unalloyed pleasure of teaching a class of infants with their dads.  All of the moms were not there for one reason or another – travel, illness, etc.  And it was such a joy  to watch these dads interact with their babies, singing, dancing, rocking, smiling, playing peekaboo.   It gave me such joy  to be a part of their lives!

And, last, but not least, I sign in tonight here on my blog to find that my blog counter has passed 90,000 hits.  Having started actively blogging in June of 2006, it’s been a journey for me, finding my voice as Molly McGinn so eloquently advised last year. (Thanks, Molly!)  I never imagined that I would have this many visitors to my blog who would apparently find something here that they were looking for.  (What that might be is beyond me!) 

Many thanks to those of you who have stopped by from time to time.  Thanks as well to those who shoot me an email to let me know I’ve messed up, or, alternatively, hit something right on the head or provided a much needed laugh or enjoyable time remembering something from the past. 

Many, many  thanks to those of you who have supported me during the past month as I’ve struggled with some family issues – some of which are now resolved and others we’re still waiting to hear about.  You’ll never know how much your encouragement has helped.

In the meantime – share the joy and do a happy dance yourself.  You just might be surprised how much better it makes you feel!  😀

Read Full Post »

Most babies come into this world with only a few notable abilities at first, namely eating, sleeping, crying, and, well,……elimination, to be blunt, although not necessarily in that order.  One of the constants in that first year of life is growth – physically, mentally, and emotionally – on a scale that is only matched again in the early teen years when, yes, they’re again extremely good at the same basic skills.  Well, at least the eating and sleeping parts!  😉

However, in an article from the Daily Mail Online, dated 23rd September, 2008, researchers now tell us that even from day one, infants have a strong sense of rhythm as well as pitch and melody.   Experts now say that introducing a child to music at an early age could possibly enhance these innate musical abilities and also help them learn to talk.

The fledgling musical talent was discovered by Hungarian researchers during a study of more than 100 boys and girls who were only one or two days old.

They played the babies music as they slept and measured their brain activity.

The researchers found that their brains computed changes in beat, tone and melody.

For instance, if a key beat was missed from a rhythmic pattern, the baby’s brain registered the change.

A change in pitch, similar to that between male and female voices, also provoked a reaction.

The Hungarian Academy of Sciences study was part of a three-year European project on how the brain processes music and other sounds, co-ordinated by Dr Susan Denham, of Plymouth University.

She said: ‘What is perhaps most significant is that not only do babies’ brains register changes in beat, pitch and simple melodic patterns but they do so more or less automatically, as they are fast asleep during these experiments.

‘People come into the world with brains that are wired-up to detect patterns’.

Dr Denham added: ‘A lot of music reflects the rhythms and contents of speech. If you are listening to music you will also probably be more sensitive to speech rhythm.’

This really does make sense when you think about it.  After all, a baby spends 9+ months in utero, listening to a steady beat 24/7 of his/her mother’s heart.  I’ve also had numerous Village moms tell me that their babies seemed to recognize not only their mothers’ voices shortly after birth, but also other voices heard consistently pre-natally, such as dad or siblings. 

One Village mom in particular told me just last year that when she was pregnant the previous year, she tended to listen to one particular artist on a regular basis, almost daily.  She had an album she enjoyed listening to, with one song that was a favorite, listening to it over and over again. 

After the birth of her daughter, with all of the adjustments and changes in the family routine that results from a firstborn, listening to albums was not high on the daily schedule – until the day that mom turned on the CD player for some badly needed relief from a crying, inconsolable baby. 

Without really consciously thinking about it, she chose the album and song she had listened to frequently during the pregnancy.  Amazingly enough, the baby stopped crying within a few seconds of the beginning strains of the song.  I don’t honestly remember the song title, but I do remember laughing with Yolanda at the time; both of us agreeing that it wasn’t the usual lullaby-type song you would expect an infant to enjoy and relax with. 

Give your baby a head-start by joining us next Saturday, October 25th, or Monday, November 3rd, as we begin Dream Pillow  in our Village classes.  Online registration is available for your convenience here.

Read Full Post »

In May, 2007, I posted a brief, hysterically funny video of Anita Renfroe entitled “Total Momsense” in which she incorporated all the sayings a mother makes in 24 hours, condensed down into 2 minutes and 55 seconds.  What I did not realize at the time was that the video I posted from Youtube did not include the entire segment. 

So – for that reason, as well as the fact that I still get a kick out of  hearing all of these ‘-isms” that I know for a fact that I’ve said numerous times over the past 30+ years to all five of my children, even as recently as last night, I offer to you the complete – *total* version of “Total Momsense” by Anita Renfroe.  Enjoy!

And not to be forgotten or “disenfranchised” as Anita says, here’s “Total Dadsense” as well.  😉

😀

To learn more about Anita Renfroe, please visit her website.

Read Full Post »

As adults, we all know (or should know) that there will always be times in our lives that things happen, situations arise, that we have absolutely no control over – the death of a loved one, the loss of a job, even our child’s first day of preschool or first grade when it is suddenly brought home to us that those early years have passed all too quickly.

Some children breeze through the “first-day-of-school” milestone with little or no difficulty whatsoever. 

Others struggle – where is this place that’s called “school”?  Will I like it?  Will I have friends there?  How long before mom and/or dad pick me up? 

Anxiety often results simply from fears of the unknown, and, while we, as adults, know that our children will probably be just fine in school, these are very real unknown concerns for many children.  With life getting busier and his world expanding exponentially, a child may feel overwhelmed by all the new expectations and requirements that come his way.

If this is your child, how can you help him or her adjust to that kind of change in their world?

Consistency.

With all the changes in his/her life, staying in Kindermusik provides a badly needed consistency required to make the transition easier.  In our Kindermusik classes, children learn to recognize the structure and routine of our class flow.  It makes for a comfortable, secure time in their weekly schedule where they know what to expect for themselves, and come to learn what is expected of themselves, as well. 

With life getting busier, and your child’s activities more independent in nature, Kindermusik is one place where the two of you can still spend precious time focused on each other.

 

See our Class Schedule for a day and time that works for your family.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »