Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Benefits’ Category

I read an interesting article today about enhancing your well-being through purposeful mental training such as that done by Buddhist monks in Tibet.

Written by Brian Maffly of the Salt Lake Tribune, it is a fascinating look into current scientific research done by Communications Psychology professor Richard Davidson of Madison University, using the latest technology such as magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, to document the startling control the monks demonstrate over their emotional states.  His resulting ideas about “neuroplasticity” — the notion that we can enhance brain function through purposeful mental training — threaten to upend conventional psychoterapy, which has little scientific basis.

Davidson is quoted as saying:

“We were all taught that the brain is different from other organs in the way it changes over time.  We thought the process was one of irrevocable death,”  Davidson said.  “We now know that view is definitely wrong.  The brain is capable of generating 7,000 to 9,000 cells a day.”

Recruited by the Dalai Lama, monks who participated in this study had spent, on average, 34,000 hours in intense meditation and were considered masters of the faith.   By using scans that tracked brain function, Davidson was able to track high levels of activity in the areas of the brain associated with emotional well-being.   Further studies documented measurable changes in brain activity after two-week sessions of mental training.

The most interesting part of this article for me is directly related to music.  Davidson states,  The brain is the only organ designed to change in response to experience.   Musical training changes the structure of the brain and when it begins earlier in life the greater the influence. (emphasis mine)

Come join us in our Kindermusik classes and create some well-being of your own for you and your child.  We gladly offer pro-rated tuition when joining after the beginning of the new semester!

For our class schedule, please visit our website.


Advertisements

Read Full Post »

I love hearing what parents have to say about Kindermusik!  After all, I’m biased – I know that it’s the very best early childhood music and movement curriculum there is!  And I know that it’s *so* much more than just music.

But to hear what a parent has to say – well, that’s a glimpse into the other side of the equation in the Kindermusik classroom – the parent and their participation in class, too.

This article by Beth Britton in Clarkesville Online shares all this, but also points out another big plus for Kindermusik parents – the Kindermusik community of other parents that are right there with you in the classroom.

beth-britton

Read what this mom from Clarkesville, Tennessee had to say about Kindermusik and the eye-opening insight she received about her own daughter while in the classroom.   Where would we be without the free thinkers of this world?  Your child *just* might be one of them!

It’s not too late to register for our upcoming Kindermusik semester which begins *next* Saturday, January 24th.    We’ll be singing Mother Goose rhymes, walking along with a dog named Rover, visiting “Cities – Busy Places, Friendly Faces” as well as playing the “Rhythms of the Land”.  Come join us!

Read Full Post »

A colleague of mine, Jenn Horak-Hulk of Waukee, Iowa, recently posted a video of Kindermusik parents who explained why they chose Kindermusik for their children.  Each one has a different perspective to offer that is well worth hearing.  And the kids are just darn cute!  Enjoy!
This highly qualified parent (Early Childhood PhD) explains why she chose Kindermusik for her own children.
Our new semester begins in just two weeks!  Home materials are being ordered today.  Have you registered your child yet?

Read Full Post »

I’ve seen this kind of thing before.  I know how music can change a person’s life.  I’ve seen it up close and personal in our own family.  But it never fails to amaze me when I see it again – changing someone else’s life – especially in such a dramatic way.  Enjoy!

Read Full Post »

Research done by Nina Kraus at Northwestern University’s Auditory Neuroscience Lab provides a fascinating look into why  musical training as a child will actually enhance your child’s language skills.  And you don’t have to become a professional musician to benefit!  Enjoy!

Many thanks goes to Debby Pool, Vice President of Product Development at Kindermusik International, Evanston, Illinois. 

Read Full Post »

As adults, we all know (or should know) that there will always be times in our lives that things happen, situations arise, that we have absolutely no control over – the death of a loved one, the loss of a job, even our child’s first day of preschool or first grade when it is suddenly brought home to us that those early years have passed all too quickly.

Some children breeze through the “first-day-of-school” milestone with little or no difficulty whatsoever. 

Others struggle – where is this place that’s called “school”?  Will I like it?  Will I have friends there?  How long before mom and/or dad pick me up? 

Anxiety often results simply from fears of the unknown, and, while we, as adults, know that our children will probably be just fine in school, these are very real unknown concerns for many children.  With life getting busier and his world expanding exponentially, a child may feel overwhelmed by all the new expectations and requirements that come his way.

If this is your child, how can you help him or her adjust to that kind of change in their world?

Consistency.

With all the changes in his/her life, staying in Kindermusik provides a badly needed consistency required to make the transition easier.  In our Kindermusik classes, children learn to recognize the structure and routine of our class flow.  It makes for a comfortable, secure time in their weekly schedule where they know what to expect for themselves, and come to learn what is expected of themselves, as well. 

With life getting busier, and your child’s activities more independent in nature, Kindermusik is one place where the two of you can still spend precious time focused on each other.

 

See our Class Schedule for a day and time that works for your family.

Read Full Post »

Tonight I received an interesting article that I thought I’d share, entitled, ” ‘Mozart effect’ or not, music is beneficial” by Mike Saelee of the UCLA Daily Bruin. 

Saelee writes about research being done at  UCLA Semel Institute’s Tennenbaum Center for the Biology of Creativity, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), to study brain activity while people listen to or create music.  The hope is that by applying the use of fMRI and music to study emotion processing in the brains of children with autism, a developmental disorder of the brain, researchers may learn more about the possible use of music as a tool to help autistic children with social engagement and communication, noted key areas of the disorder. 

“The study will examine how the brain processes emotion in children with autism by measuring blood flow while listening to pleasant and unpleasant music,” said Istvan Molnar-Szakacs, a neuroscientist at the UCLA Semel Institute’s Tennenbaum Center for the Biology of Creativity. 

The positive therapeutic effects of music are also being harnessed and used in hospitals and other types of health institutions, such as rehabilitation facilities and nursing homes.   Vanya Green, a music therapist at UCLA, is quoted as saying, “Music enables an emotional level to be reached that may not be done in other modalities.”   The type of music therapy used depends upon the assessment of the client’s specific needs  derived by the music therapist. 

The simple process of remembering and producing a familiar tune such as “Here comes the Bride” occurs because the centers of the brain that process music and sound evolved from processing sounds of danger and/or threat to human life.  Due to the importance of understanding and comprehending sounds for survival, sounds have a direct route to the limbic system, which is a set of brain structures involved in emotion processing and to areas important for processing reward.  This also explains why so many of us actively turn to music we enjoy, that gives us pleasure. 

Molnar-Szakacs of UCLA is quoted as saying, “These pathways are now used for processing all sounds, from a lion’s roar to a Beethoven symphony, allowing us to listen to music and feel incredibly moved.  There is music at the mall, music at the gym, music in the car, and music on our phone. We pretty much live with a permanent soundtrack.”

I don’t know about you, but I think my “permanent soundtrack” sometimes needs a good “shuffle” in it!  🙂

 

To read this article in its entirety, please visit the UCLA Daily Bruin here.

Thanks goes to Remy Moore, Media Projects Assistant at Simply Music.com, for providing this article to us.  Thanks, Remy!

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »